DMA in Performance

Program Requirements

Applicants admitted with a Master’s degree in performance must complete a minimum of five full courses. MUS 4800H DMA Seminar is taken in the first term and work on MUS 4899H Research in Performance is begun in the second. MUS 4844Y and MUS 4845Y Advanced Applied Music I & II are also required. The two remaining full course requirements must be graduate seminar courses. Coursework should be completed by the end of the second year of study with an average grade of at least A-. Exceptions to the time of completion are Research in Performance, which lays the groundwork for the dissertation research and leads to a Major Field examination in the middle of year two, and Advanced Applied Music II. Students may be required to take additional courses or acquire other skills to meet the needs of their proposed areas of study.

Students will also be required to perform three DMA Recitals MUS 4866Y, MUS 4877Y, MUS 4888Y. These recitals are in addition to the five full course requirements. The format of these recitals will be determined in consultation with the Applied Music teacher and the supervisory committee.

In addition, reading knowledge in one language other than English is required. The required language will be determined by the Department. The Department may require competence in additional languages. All remaining course and language requirements, including the field exam, must be completed successfully by the end of year two.

Detailed Program Description

There are six main requirements in the DMA program in Performance:

a) Fulfillment of the residence requirement
b) Fulfillment of course requirements
c) Successful completion of the Major Field examination associated with MUS 4899H Research in Performance
d) Fulfillment of language requirement(s)
e) Successful completion of three DMA Recitals
f) The writing and successful defense of a dissertation

Admission Requirements
Applicants must hold a master’s degree with a specialization in performance and must have an average standing of A- or better. Any two failures requires the student to withdraw from the program. Applicants are required to pass an audition. They are also required to submit, as part of their application, an essay of approximately 3,000 words which demonstrates their ability to handle a research problem. Applicants, whether from the University of Toronto or from elsewhere, may be interviewed by the Department.

A. Residence Requirement

DMA students are required to be in residence for two years except for absences necessary for research and authorized and approved by the Department. To fulfill this requirement a student must be in such geographical proximity as to be able to visit the campus regularly and participate fully in the university’s activities associated with the program.

B. Course Requirements

Students are required to take five full-course equivalents. All required courses, with the exception of Advanced Applied Music I & II, must be graduate seminar courses. The Department may prescribe additional courses if it is felt they are necessary to develop the knowledge and skills required for a student’s proposed area of study. By the end of the first year of registration, two and a half full-course equivalents must be completed with an average grade of A-: the DMA seminar is compulsory and must be taken in the first term; other courses will be graduate seminar courses chosen from a Departmental list although, with Departmental approval, one half-course at the graduate level may be taken outside the Department. In addition, MUS 4899H Research in Performance, which lays the groundwork for the dissertation, must be started at the beginning of the second term of the first year and must be completed by the end of the first term of year two.

During their first year, students are expected to discuss their interests, expectations and research objectives with faculty members. An appropriate supervisor for MUS 4899H Research in Performance must then be agreed upon. The supervisor will be primarily responsible for determining the structure and content of Research in Performance, which will include a research paper.

Two full courses of applied lessons, Advanced Applied Music I & II, are required. The structure of these lessons will be made in consultation with the major teacher, and distributed over the four years of the program as determined by the teacher. The student will register for Advanced Applied Music II after the completion of the lessons in Applied Music I. These lessons are intended to prepare the student for the required three DMA Recitals and must be completed prior to the final recital.

Participation in ensembles and other performing groups may be required as part of an individual’s area of study. However, these courses will not count as part of the required five full-courses.

An average grade of A- must be maintained to continue with the doctorate. All course requirements, with the exception of Applied Music II, must be completed by the end of year two.

C. Research Paper/Dissertation Proposal/Major Field Examination

MUS 4899H Research Paper
The research paper in MUS 4899H Research in Performance should set the groundwork for the research and writing of the DMA dissertation. The supervisor of MUS 4899H will oversee the writing of the research paper, and will approve the submission of the research paper to the Graduate Department.

The research paper should be submitted to the Graduate Department for distribution to members of the Major Field Examination Committee by April 1 of year two. The Major Field Examination should be scheduled no sooner than four weeks after the submission of the research paper.

Dissertation Proposal
The student must submit an initial dissertation proposal of up to 2000 words by March 1 of year two. This proposal will derive from the research and writing undertaken for MUS 4899H Research in Performance, and its purpose is to elicit constructive advice from graduate faculty that may help both to direct the student’s study and to prepare him or her for the Major Field Examination.

The School of Graduate Studies regulations stipulate that only a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty may supervise a doctoral dissertation. In many cases the Supervisor of the MUS 4899H Research in Performance will be a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty and will act consequently as the Supervisor of the dissertation proposal and the dissertation. If the Supervisor of MUS 4899H Research in Performance is an Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty, it may be that the Supervisor will work as a Co-Supervisor with a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty.

The supervisor of MUS 4899H will submit the completed dissertation proposal to the Associate Dean, Graduate Education who will then send the proposal to all full-time Performance Division faculty for comments. Faculty members will be given two weeks to reply with comments. These comments will be sent directly to the Supervisor of MUS4899H and copied to the graduate department. Replies should not be copied to all full-time faculty members.

The supervisor of MUS 4899H will convey comments from faculty members to the student. Based on these comments and in consultation with the Supervisor, the student will prepare a final draft of the dissertation proposal, which will be submitted to the Major Field Examination Committee along with the research paper. Both the research paper and the dissertation proposal will be used by the Committee in preparing questions for the Major Field Examination.

Major Field Examination
The Major Field examination is associated with MUS 4899H Research in Performance and is scheduled to take place no later than May of year two. The purpose of the Major Field examination is to assess the student’s general knowledge of his or her chosen research field, to examine the theoretical premises and methodological approaches set out in the research paper, and to determine eligibility to continue to the research and writing stages of the dissertation.

The Major Field Examination is an oral examination administered by a committee of three examiners, and shall not exceed two hours in length. The chair of the examining committee will normally be the Supervisor of MUS 4899H. The other two members of the committee will be members of the graduate faculty, and will assigned by the Associate Dean, Graduate Education in consultation with the Performance Coordinator. Wherever possible, the other two members of the committee shall have expertise in the student’s area of research.

The Supervisor of MUS 4899H will determine a grade for Research in Performance, and the Major Field Examination Committee will pass or fail the student’s performance in the oral examination. The student must attain at least an A- in Research in Performance and a pass on the oral examination in order to proceed with the DMA. In the event that these standards are not met, a second Major Field Examination will be scheduled approximately two months later for the resubmission of the research paper and/or a second attempt at the oral examination. A failure to achieve the standards set for the written and/or oral examination at the second attempt results in the student being required to withdraw from the program.

It is the responsibility of the Associate Dean, Graduate Education to inform the student of the results of the Major Field Examination as soon as possible. It is the responsibility of the Major Field Examination Committee to make a recommendation to the Associate Dean, Graduate Education concerning the timing of the second examination if necessary. The committee appointed to conduct the second examination should as far as possible be comprised of the same members who examined the student in the first place.

On successful completion of all courses, language and Major Field Examination requirements, a doctoral student becomes a doctoral candidate and embarks fully on dissertation research and writing and on the completion of the recital requirements.

Schedule for Major Field Examination
These dates are the final deadlines in scheduling the Major Field Examination. An earlier timeline is acceptable in consultation with the Supervisor of MUS 4899H.

March 1 – Supervisor of MUS 4899H shall submit an electronic copy of the student’s dissertation proposal to the Graduate Department for distribution to full-time Performance faculty. If the Supervisor of MUS 4899H Research in Performance is an Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty, a Full Member may submit the proposal aas the Principal Supervisor or as a Co-Supervisor of the dissertation.

March 15 – All comments on the dissertation proposal from full-time Performance faculty shall be received by the intended thesis supervisor(s) and the Graduate Department.

April 1 – Student shall submit three (3) hard copies of the research paper and final draft of the dissertation proposal to the Graduate Department for distribution to the Major Field Examination Committee.

May 1 – Major Field examination shall be scheduled to take place not earlier than four weeks after the submission of the hard copies of the MUS 4899H Research in Performance paper and the final draft of the dissertation proposal.

D. Language Requirements

Students must demonstrate an advanced reading knowledge of a language other than English, usually French, German or Italian. This required language will be determined by the Associate Dean, Graduate Education in consultation with the Performance Coordinator and the supervisor of MUS 4899H Research in Performance. The Department may also require competence in additional languages deemed necessary for a proposed area of research. Language requirements must be completed successfully by the end of year two.

Once the required language is determined, the requirement may be satisfied in one of several ways:
1. Satisfactory completion of a graduate reading course in the language at the University of Toronto.
2. Satisfactory completion of a language examination administered by a language department at the University of Toronto.
3. Satisfactory completion of a language examination administered by the Faculty of Music. This exam will be a translation of a musical text in the second language.

E. DMA Recitals

Three DMA Recitals, MUS 4866Y, MUS 4877Y, MUS 4888Y, are required over the four years of the doctoral program. Normally the recitals will take place in the third and fourth years of the program, but the exact timing as well as the format of these recitals will be determined in consultation with the major teacher and supervisor. All three recitals must be successfully completed prior to the oral defense of the dissertation. The recital grade is pass/fail.

DMA Recital adjudication will be made at the recital by three members of the graduate faculty. Where possible, adjudicators will be faculty members who are familiar with the student’s area of performance. The student’s Applied Music instructor may be a member of the recital committee if the instructor is a member of the graduate faculty.
The choice of members of the adjudication committee will be made by the student, who may consult with the Performance Coordinator to determine appropriate membership of the committee. It is the responsibility of the student to confirm the attendance of committee members at the recital. There will be no pre-recital jury as there is at the Master’s level.

If the student fails the recital he or she will be given one more opportunity to pass the recital. Two failures of the same recital will result in the student being required to withdraw from the program. The format of the recitals is up to the discretion of the Applied Music instructor in consultation with the student and the Doctoral Advisory Committee. If a recital is planned prior to the formation of a Doctoral Advisory Committee, the format of the recitals shall be determined by the Applied Music instructor in consultation with the student, the Associate Dean, Graduate Education, and the Performance Coordinator.

If a venue other than a regularly used venue at the Faculty of Music is used for the recital, all expenses pertaining to the use of that venue and the recording of the recital will be incurred by the student.

The format of the recitals may include solo performance, chamber music, lecture recital, CD, or DVD. If the CD or DVD option is chosen, all expenses incurred are the responsibility of the student. The following is a document which outlines the regulations of the CD or DVD option.

REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO THE FOLLOWING OPTION:

Replace one of three DMA required recitals with a recording project

Regulations:

1. You must be a featured performer on the recording, just as in any ensemble recital.
2. Sufficient opportunities must exist for the evaluators to assess you as a performer, not only as an arranger/composer, or any of your other roles in the recording’s production.
3. The recording must be a fully completed project.
a. Artwork must be completed
b. If applicable, all licenses paid for copyrighted material by third parties.
c. Fully mastered
4. All work presented on the recording must be done during the time you are enrolled in the DMA program. This includes all original compositions and any arrangements.
5. The Faculty of Music provides no financial support for these projects.
6. One copy of the recording will be kept in archives as evidence of the work completed and also to share your work with future DMA students.

Procedures:

1. You must submit a demo quality copy of your work including all pieces for approval. This may take the form of an unmastered rough mix. It must involve the musicians you will use on the final project. Submission will normally involve two members of the graduate faculty.
2. A date for submission of the final product will be set at the time of approval of the submission of the rough mix.

F. The Doctoral Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation must be a piece of original scholarship submitted in conformity with the guidelines stated below. In most cases, the doctoral candidate’s supervisor for MUS 4899H Research in Performance will continue to act as supervisor for the rest of the doctorate. However, the supervisor of the doctoral dissertation must be a full member of the graduate faculty.

The School of Graduate Studies regulations stipulate that only a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty may supervise a doctoral dissertation. In many cases the Supervisor of the MUS 4899H Research in Performance will be a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty and will act consequently as the Supervisor of the dissertation proposal and the dissertation. If the Supervisor of MUS 4899H Research in Performance is an Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty, it may be that the Supervisor will work as a Co-Supervisor with a Full Member of the Graduate Faculty.

A Doctoral Advisory Committee will be struck upon successful completion of MUS 4899H Research in Performance and the Major Field Examination: this committee must consist of at least three members of the University of Toronto’s graduate faculty, one of whom, if appropriate, may be from outside the Graduate Department of Music. In many cases, the Major Field Examination Committee will become the candidate’s Doctoral Advisory Committee.

The student will invite a faculty member to be his or her dissertation supervisor. When a faculty member has agreed to serve as dissertation supervisor, the student, in consultation with this supervisor, will invite other members of the graduate faculty to serve on the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

Within a month of the successful completion of MUS 4899H Research in Performance and the Major Field Examination, a revised and more detailed dissertation proposal must be submitted to the Doctoral Advisory Committee that also outlines a tentative schedule for research and writing. Thereafter the candidate will meet regularly with the supervisor, and no less than twice a year with the Doctoral Advisory Committee. The candidate will prepare progress reports, including written work, to be circulated to committee members at least two weeks in advance of the meetings (or longer, in the event of a substantial body of written work). The Doctoral Advisory Committee will then prepare its own report of the meeting and will indicate whether or not satisfactory progress towards the doctorate has been made. In cases where progress is unsatisfactory, clear guidelines must be provided that set out expectations to be met at the next meeting. Two unsatisfactory assessments (consecutive or in total) will result in the candidate being required to withdraw from the program.

In many cases, fieldwork will be required as part of the doctoral study. Candidates planning to undertake fieldwork must apply to the Associate Dean, Graduate Education for off-campus status. All off-campus candidates must leave a formal field address with the Graduate Office while they are away. Since it is each candidate’s responsibility to apply for off-campus status, failure to apply could result in forfeiture of registration, fellowships and awards, teaching assistantships, and/or loss of full-time graduate status. University policy regarding the “Safety in Field Research” document (http://www.ehs.utoronto.ca/resources/manindex/policies/fieldres.htm) outlines a hierarchy of responsibility for safety starting with the candidate’s academic supervisor. Before departing for the field, the candidate must file a letter with the Department acknowledging awareness of any risks in the proposed fieldwork. In some instances, doctoral candidates may need to satisfy an ethics review, in which case research must be structured according to the University of Toronto’s guidelines on the use of human subjects.

When the Doctoral Advisory Committee is satisfied that the dissertation is ready to proceed to an oral defense, the candidate will prepare the work according to the formatting guidelines established by the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies. The dissertation shall not exceed 40,000 words exclusive of notes, bibliography, and musical examples. Exceeding the prescribed length limit is a sufficient reason for a dissertation to be refused examination. Once the dissertation has been fully prepared for submission, a doctoral candidate becomes a doctoral author.

Final oral examinations are administered through the School of Graduate Studies. A date will be set for the DMA defense roughly eight weeks after the submission of the dissertation. The Doctoral Defense Committee will ordinarily consist of five or six voting members, (there must be a quorum of four voting members), and will include the supervisor, other members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee (only two of whom may be voting members), at least one internal reader who has not been closely involved in the supervision of the thesis, and an external examiner from another university who is an expert in the author’s field of study. The external examiner will provide a written report to the author and the other members of the Doctoral Defense Committee no less than two weeks prior to the defense.

G. Extensions, Lapsing and Reinstatement

It is the Graduate Department of Music’s aim that doctoral candidates complete their degrees within four years. A candidate who has failed to complete all degree requirements within six years may be granted a one-year extension, if the Department approves. The Department is likely to approve such a request if the candidate can provide evidence that he or she has made substantial progress and is likely to finish within the one-year extension. The DMA candidates who fail to complete the program in that period may apply for a further extension of up to one year, but the Department scrutinizes such an application very carefully and consents only if it is persuaded that the thesis and recitals will be completed within the period of extension. Third extensions are decided by the School of Graduate Studies and are rarely granted.

A failure to complete the program after an extension, or the refusal of an extension by the School of Graduate Studies, results in the lapsing of the candidacy. Lapsing does not mean termination. The School of Graduate Studies thinks of the lapsed candidate as being “inactive.” Lapsing has the effect of withdrawing the privileges that membership in the University brings – the right to library use, to supervision, and so on. But those whose candidacy has lapsed are encouraged by the Department to finish their programs and are helped in every way possible while doing so. Dissertations must be complete before an individual applies for reinstatement by the School of Graduate Studies. Candidates will be required to pay at least the equivalent of one term’s full-time fee in order to be reinstated.

A request for reinstatement may be refused when, in the view of the Department Chair, the thesis or research paper is not sufficiently complete or of sufficiently high quality for the Department to support it.

Proposed Course Schedule

Year 1 – 1st Semester
DMA Seminar
Advanced Applied Music I (MUS 4844Y)
1 half-course elective
(MUS4815H Seminar in Performance Pedagogy – optional )

Year 1 – 2nd Semester
Research in Performance (MUS 4899H)
1 half-course elective
(MUS4815H Seminar in Performance Literature-optional)

Year 2 – 1st Semester Year 2 – 2nd Semester
Advanced Applied Music II (MUS 4845Y) (continuation of Adv. Applied Music II)
(Continuation of Research in Performance) Major Field Exam
1 half-course elective 1 half-course elective
Fulfillment of language requirement(s)

Year 3 – 1st Semester Year 3 – 2nd Semester
DMA Recital I (MUS 4866Y) DMA Recital II (MUS 4877Y)
Dissertation research

Year 4 - 2nd Semester Year 4 – 2nd Semester
DMA Recital III (MUS 4888Y)
Dissertation research Dissertation defense

Course Descriptions

DMA Seminar (MUS 4800H)
Faculty: John Brownell, Ph.D.
The course will involve readings and discussions on subjects selected by the course instructor. Each student will be required to select a course project, approved by the instructor, on a subject related to the seminar, and to make a presentation of the same material. The format may vary from year to year but will emphasize performance-related topics such as master classes, workshops, lecture recitals and outreach concerts. Students will research their selected topic and present it in a public forum.

Seminar in Performance Literature (MUS 4810H)
Faculty: Staff
Course will be in sections according to relevant performance area and taught by Faculty members in that performance area.

Seminar in Performance Pedagogy (MUS 4815H)
Faculty: Staff
Course will be in sections according to relevant performance area and taught by Faculty members in that performance area.

Research in Performance (MUS 4899H)
Faculty: Supervisor
Independent research by doctoral students, under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

Advanced Applied Music I (MUS 4844Y)
Faculty: Major teacher

Advanced Applied Music II (MUS 4845Y)
Faculty: Major teacher

DMA Recital I (MUS 4866Y)
DMA Recital II (MUS 4877Y)
DMA Recital III (MUS 4888Y)